GRADUATE ROSTER-FALL 2018


        Andrea Bagdon

       Painting

email: Andrea.bagdon@colostate.edu


Samuel Dong Saul

Graphic Design

My art making process is a constant observation of the inner working of my mind, and the external inputs I experience from my surroundings. I strive to find a deeper connection with the objects that were part of my life, to understand better how it is I can then manipulate to preserve their objecthood. As a Graphic Designer in a fine art environment, I profoundly question my roles in a consumeristic society, and observe how my work has an effect on those who experience it. The objects that I make reflect the stories of the objects that surround me. They are a constant reminder of my past and emotional state of being.

email: Samuel.ds@rams.colostate.edu


Lauren Faherty

Sculpture

Lauren Faherty earned her BFA in Sculpture at the University of Minnesota-Duluth in 2016. She is currently in her second year at Colorado State University pursuing her MFA with a concentration in Sculpture. Her studio practice examines memory and material culture as apart of a complex system that constructs a sense of self and community. The found individual 

moments in the materials she uses construct narratives that overlap, weave and intermingle. It is here the materials become alive through their interactions with one another. The ability of fabric and rope to embrace the ephemeral while addressing the multiplicity of life makes it an ideal material to work with. The subtle movements produced by these materials act as a collection of memory taking shape in three-dimensional forms.

www.laurenfaherty.com

email: Lauren.faherty@colostate.edu


Alex Forsythe

     Metalsmithing and Jewelry

Alex headshot

Time is an ongoing focus in my artistic practice. I engage with my own perception of spatiotemporal experience through the use of replication and multiples, linear arrangements and process based approaches to art making. Through daily effort, my work takes shape. I utilize repetitive, labor intensive methods to create singular visual arrangements that both embody and represent time.

Degrees, 365″ bronze, c.2018, 28″h x 54″w x 26″ d

 


Spencer Gillespie

Painting

My art has become a means of self-discovery and reflection. While engaging in a stream of conscious creativity, I seek to capture human emotions through visual stimulation. I capture romantic individualism with large writing and marks varying in color, size, and placement. I wish for others to feel the same sense of wonder and “sublime” while viewing my work as I did creating it. While creating large scale mixed media paintings, my studio becomes an all attention consuming therapeutic and meditative workplace.

I focus entirely on the moment within the context of the materials and my previously made choices. Encompassing a wide array of gestural motions to create marks and write words, each layer speaks at a different volume depending on the material used, color choice, the characteristic of the mark, and the current composition. I have always scribbled on scraps of paper or journals as a means of escaping and processing my thoughts. This naturally flowed over into my artwork as I began to study Abstract Expressionism.

 

email: Spencer.gillespie@colostate.edu


Hanna Guilfoyle

Printmaking

I am a first-year MFA candidate in printmaking, after having spent the last three years teaching art, Spanish, and science in Baltimore City, Maryland.  My work centers on preserving a place and holding a specific location “sacred.”  Remnants of this place become “relics,” and when they are included in my prints, my prints become “reliquaries.”  Just as a physical relic degrades over time, so does memory.  Each time a memory is recalled, a new neural pathway is created in the brain; the act of remembering in itself is enough to change the memory.  To reflect this degradation I work primarily with state printing, with each stage of the print reflect a different remembering of a place.  I combine these intaglio and relief prints with natural materials gathered from the place I am depicting (“relics”) as well as traditional materials used in reliquaries such as lapis lazuli (in ultramarine) and gold leaf.

email: Johanna.guilfoyle@colostate.edu


Jasmine Holmes

Drawing

email: Jasmine.holmes@colostate.edu


Jacob Jaso

Fibers

Exploring relationships and connections to my identity as a Canadian, I create quilted works that express those memories/moments in an ability to preserve an protect them.

 

 

 

email: Jacob.jaso@colostate.edu


Zach Leonard

Drawing

email: Zachary.leonard@colostate.edu


Christy Nelson

Painting

My paintings explore the longing for safety and the items that bring the feeling of security. In my works, relics (ancestral quilts and field guides) from my childhood place of sanctuary are juxtaposed with salvaged patterns of discarded security envelopes. The childhood objects represent refuge while the envelope patterns act as a motif exploring mankind’s desire for control. The ability of encaustic to embrace the serene and ethereal aesthetic of safety, while also highlighting the ephemeral nature of control, makes it an ideal material for these pieces. Vellum and Dura-lar create a similar aesthetic as encaustic and are visually cohesive for developing color studies.

 

 

christynelsonart.com


Patrick Price

Sculpture

As a first-year graduate student in sculpture, I hope to explore the connections between objects and artifacts and their relationship to individual and collective narratives.  In investigating objects and the context within which they are received, I want to ignite conversations regarding identity, culture, and myth and their place in the way we tell our own individual stories within our communities and the greater world at large.

email: Patrick.price@colostate.edu


Emily Boutilier Sullivan

Painting

Emily Sullivan is from Cincinnati, OH and has a BFA in Painting, Drawing, and Art Education from Xavier University. She is currently in her final year of the MFA Painting program at CSU. Her work explores liminal space, transience, and movement. She draws upon her own movement through space, navigating a years long, long-distance relationship with her husband — including frequent cross-country flights, long highway commutes, and relocating around the country. The paintings are in a state of flux – longing for, or awaiting, a stability that may never come. The work is both referential and ambiguous, existing in a transitional, in-between space where viewers cannot fully place the scene. 

Fleeting time and a lack of  grounding is suggested through the marks on paper, as well as an adherence to “no place” and a familiarity with elsewhere. It is through these paintings and drawings that Sullivan begins to feel at ease with this movement, seeing what can be gained instead of what is lost.

Website: www.emilyjbsullivan.com

Instagram: @emilyjbsullivan 

 

 

 


Janine Thornton

        Fibers

In this work, I explore time and interconnection. Connections are organic, growing and shifting through time as we do. Cells combine to delineate our forms.

Relationships and interactions with others define the threads that join us. The materials I use reflect these connections by embodying strength and fragility, solidity and temporality. Structural pieces support and constrain the connections, providing solidity and shape. Threads move between these structures, carrying energy and information across the network. Through these pieces, I examine inner and outer connectedness, depicting personal connections that define relationships in my life.

email: Janine.thornton@colostate.edu


Isaac Trujillo

Printmaking

My name is Isaac Trujillo, I am a printmaker that is influenced by the world of rock climbing and stone lithography. I find inspiration from time spent outside exploring new rocks to climb and working in the printmaking studio as (I grain into new layers of limestone for my next print) (explore new processes.

 

Discovering these untouched materials of our planet earth is what ultimately drives my art  practice on the conceptual level. The physical interactions I have with hard rock is why I like to share my perspective as an artist and extreme athlete.

email: isaac.trujillo@colostate.edu


Zane White

Painting

Artist Statement: I use layers in my work to  illustrate the structure of information, meaning, and understanding  present in a given topic. My work currently examines dire socio-  political issues from an allegorical point of view, portraying  contemporary social events as repeating renditions in a theater of  universal symbolic paradigms.

“Dreams are Dreams: Duality”
Oil On Wood Panel 2016 14 x 16

I attempt to create paintings that seem to  exist beyond measurable time and space. Paintings that capture a  universe that is both dreamlike and absolute. The images and objects  dreamlike. The symbolic meaning and context urgent and undeniable. This  dualistic synthesis is meant to evoke a resolution, or realization, that  reveals fundamental essences of existence.

email: Zane.white@colostate.edu


Amy Young

Fibers

Retrogression and nostalgia are inescapable topics when reflecting on the current decade. I am fascinated that certain styles and trends resurface, and it isn’t coincidental that these trends are often futuristic in their aesthetic. This retrogression in style begins to create a conversation between American culture’s need to look to the past for inspiration and its desire to constantly move forward. By emulating and distorting imagery from the past and combining it with imagery of the present, I am visually representing these resurfacing trends and the idea of nostalgia.


Graduate Studio Phones
Computer Lab; 491-3514
Drawing; 491-7965
Fibers; 491-7992
Metal; 491-5993
Paint; 491-7877
Printmaking; 491-3563
Sculpture; 491-7880